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Council for Accreditation of Canadian University
Programs in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

More Information About the Profession


Canadian Universities have been offering programs in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) to prepare professionals as speech-language pathologists and audiologists since the middle of the last century. Eight programs were established between 1956 and 1995: Université de Montréal (1956), University of Toronto (1958), University of Alberta (1968), University of British Columbia (1969), McGill (1964), University of Western Ontario (1970), Dalhousie University (1976), and Université d' Ottawa (1993). Université Laval was established more recently, in 2000.


Of the nine universities, five offer programs in both speech-language pathology and audiology: University of British Columbia, University of Western Ontario, Université d'Ottawa, Université de Montréal, and Dalhousie University. Four offer a speech-language pathology program solely: University of Alberta, University of Toronto, McGill University, and Université Laval. Three programs are in French: Université de Montréal, Université Laval, and Université d'Ottawa. The remaining six are offered in English. Eight professional programs in speech-language pathology and audiology are offered exclusively at the graduate level. Only the Université de Montréal offers an undergraduate as well as a graduate program.


The curricula established by the original eight universities are standardized to the extent that each offers a coherent sequence of courses that are consistent with the Foundations of Clinical Practice for Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology published by the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists (CASLPA).


More information about the nine programs offered in Canada can be found below:


University of Alberta

University of British Columbia

Dalhousie University

Université Laval

McGill University

Université de Montréal

University of Ottawa

University of Toronto

University of Western Ontario